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  • 10 Jul 2016

    The correct way to photograph billfish

    Billfish Belong in the Water, Not a Boat’s Cockpit! A recent study shows that the odds of big-fish survival go way up when anglers release them after “zero air time.” Led by John Graves, chair of the fisheries science department at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, a team of scientists planted pop-up archival tags in 18 white marlin. Seven of those were released after five minutes of air time (kept in the cockpit, out of the water), five after three minutes of air time, and six after one minute in the air. In the final analysis, four of the seven five-minute fish died, two of the five three-minute fish died, and one of the six one-minute fish died. (It’s also worth noting that fish that swim away from the boat are not necessarily healthy.) In a previous study Graves conducted, the marlin released were not removed from the water at all. Of 59 marlin tagged and released in that study, only a single fish died. That’s a 1.7 percent mortality rate. While those fish held in the air for only a minute fared better than those held out for longer, one of six not surviving equals a 17 percent mortality rate. That’s hardly satisfactory, particularly versus the 1.7 percent rate for fish left in the water. “All in all,” says Dr. Graves, “these results offer a pretty compelling reason not to remove [marlin] from the water.” While Graves’ revealing work has focused on the white marlin off the Virginia coast, I have to think that common sense should suggest hauling any large fish — notably, any species of billfish or big tarpon — into a boat’s cockpit to take photos would likely lead to similarly adverse results. Of course, keeping any fish out of the water if you intend to release it is bad practice, but whereas smaller fish can be photographed in seconds and put back over, bigger fish may require precious minutes. And larger fish are more likely to be damaged by handling, especially when removed from the supporting medium for which they’re designed. They’re also more likely to have a large oxygen debt after a prolonged fight, more urgently needing to be in water to breathe. As the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission advises, “Keeping an exhausted fish out of water is like holding a bag over a runner who has just completed a marathon.” Credit for initial article from Sport Fishing Magazine
    239 Posted by Fishing Asia
  • The correct way to photograph billfish

    Billfish Belong in the Water, Not a Boat’s Cockpit! A recent study shows that the odds of big-fish survival go way up when anglers release them after “zero air time.” Led by John Graves, chair of the fisheries science department at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, a team of scientists planted pop-up archival tags in 18 white marlin. Seven of those were released after five minutes of air time (kept in the cockpit, out of the water), five after three minutes of air time, and six after one minute in the air. In the final analysis, four of the seven five-minute fish died, two of the five three-minute fish died, and one of the six one-minute fish died. (It’s also worth noting that fish that swim away from the boat are not necessarily healthy.) In a previous study Graves conducted, the marlin released were not removed from the water at all. Of 59 marlin tagged and released in that study, only a single fish died. That’s a 1.7 percent mortality rate. While those fish held in the air for only a minute fared better than those held out for longer, one of six not surviving equals a 17 percent mortality rate. That’s hardly satisfactory, particularly versus the 1.7 percent rate for fish left in the water. “All in all,” says Dr. Graves, “these results offer a pretty compelling reason not to remove [marlin] from the water.” While Graves’ revealing work has focused on the white marlin off the Virginia coast, I have to think that common sense should suggest hauling any large fish — notably, any species of billfish or big tarpon — into a boat’s cockpit to take photos would likely lead to similarly adverse results. Of course, keeping any fish out of the water if you intend to release it is bad practice, but whereas smaller fish can be photographed in seconds and put back over, bigger fish may require precious minutes. And larger fish are more likely to be damaged by handling, especially when removed from the supporting medium for which they’re designed. They’re also more likely to have a large oxygen debt after a prolonged fight, more urgently needing to be in water to breathe. As the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission advises, “Keeping an exhausted fish out of water is like holding a bag over a runner who has just completed a marathon.” Credit for initial article from Sport Fishing Magazine
    Jul 10, 2016 239
  • 04 Nov 2015

    Welcome to Fishing Asia!

    After nearly a year of planning, coding and testing we have finally put the site live in Beta version as we continue to add the content. It's been a long old haul to get to this point but well worth it, the site is really starting to take shape, but if you find any bugs please let us know. The site itself has four main sections: The Fishing Locations This is the core of the site and as time goes on we hope it will become the largest collection of fishing spots in the World. Anybody can upload a location, just go to the Add New Location link in the top right hand corner screen on desktop, or in the menu dropdown on mobile. On mobile you can get your location by tapping the Locate Me button to make it super simple, please make sure you have your location services on your phone switched on when you do this. The idea with the fishing locations is to promote fishing in natural locations. We love the pay lakes as much as anybody and they are a vital part of the fishing industry, but our real passion is the great outdoors, going to rivers, lakes and on to the sea where you really could catch anything. What's New This is your activity feed showing everything that has been happening on the site, that you are following. It will show where your friends have been fishing, what they are catching, and let you keep up with everything of interest in the World of fishing. Forum Social networks are great but there is nothing like a forum to really get into some serious debate and information gathering. We have structured the forum to talk mainly about the species of fish and how to catch them, as this is clearly the thing that people care about the most. Groups These can be opened by any member and are meant to be the more social side of the site which you don't get with a standard forum, they're perfect for fishing clubs and networks but basically anything goes! There is obviously also this blog where we will be posting anything and everything we think will be of interest to our members, and showing off quite a few new toys...
    754 Posted by Fishing Asia
  • Welcome to Fishing Asia!

    After nearly a year of planning, coding and testing we have finally put the site live in Beta version as we continue to add the content. It's been a long old haul to get to this point but well worth it, the site is really starting to take shape, but if you find any bugs please let us know. The site itself has four main sections: The Fishing Locations This is the core of the site and as time goes on we hope it will become the largest collection of fishing spots in the World. Anybody can upload a location, just go to the Add New Location link in the top right hand corner screen on desktop, or in the menu dropdown on mobile. On mobile you can get your location by tapping the Locate Me button to make it super simple, please make sure you have your location services on your phone switched on when you do this. The idea with the fishing locations is to promote fishing in natural locations. We love the pay lakes as much as anybody and they are a vital part of the fishing industry, but our real passion is the great outdoors, going to rivers, lakes and on to the sea where you really could catch anything. What's New This is your activity feed showing everything that has been happening on the site, that you are following. It will show where your friends have been fishing, what they are catching, and let you keep up with everything of interest in the World of fishing. Forum Social networks are great but there is nothing like a forum to really get into some serious debate and information gathering. We have structured the forum to talk mainly about the species of fish and how to catch them, as this is clearly the thing that people care about the most. Groups These can be opened by any member and are meant to be the more social side of the site which you don't get with a standard forum, they're perfect for fishing clubs and networks but basically anything goes! There is obviously also this blog where we will be posting anything and everything we think will be of interest to our members, and showing off quite a few new toys...
    Nov 04, 2015 754