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    Catch and Release

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    • January 1, 2016 6:42 PM
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      Catch and Release

      Hi guys.  I'm new here and have been looking online at some of the huge fish caught in this area.  I've also read that most are released.  Can you keep any just for eating purposes?  Won't the release of these huge fish over populate the fishing area? 

    • January 1, 2016 7:44 PM
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      Untitled title

      Catch and release is the way to go in this area of the world.

      Firstly most of the native species are now pretty much only caught in the big fishing parks, most are on the endangered list because of over fishing and the change in habitat from hydro electric dams. Most of these native species will not breed in lakes so over population is not an issue. In the wild Thai fish are adapted to the moonson rain season moving out of the rivers into feeder streams and flood plains (rice paddies) to lay there eggs.

      Finacially these fish are too valuable a commodity to eat, most taste like shit anyway.

      If you want to eat your catch go thai style, pay 50-100 baht to fish for Tab Tim (orange Talipia), Pla Nin (Nile Talipia) or Pla Dok (walking catfish) and pay by the kilo for your fish. These are the main fish farmed for eating, so are sustainable.

    • January 1, 2016 8:37 PM
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      Untitled title

      Tony Bignall said:

      Catch and release is the way to go in this area of the world.

      Firstly most of the native species are now pretty much only caught in the big fishing parks, most are on the endangered list because of over fishing and the change in habitat from hydro electric dams. Most of these native species will not breed in lakes so over population is not an issue. In the wild Thai fish are adapted to the moonson rain season moving out of the rivers into feeder streams and flood plains (rice paddies) to lay there eggs.

      Finacially these fish are too valuable a commodity to eat, most taste like shit anyway.

      If you want to eat your catch go thai style, pay 50-100 baht to fish for Tab Tim (orange Talipia), Pla Nin (Nile Talipia) or Pla Dok (walking catfish) and pay by the kilo for your fish. These are the main fish farmed for eating, so are sustainable.

      Spot on Tony.

      I think the only thing I would add is that is are a type of lake where over population, or over stocking, does occur. From my experience they tend to be lakes like Jomtien Fishing Park where the water is literally teeming with catfish, so when you put some bait in they have no choice but to go for it otherwise they go hungry, despite knowing on some level they could well be hooked.

      There is an interesting place I found on Boxing Day called Nadee Fishing Park where they were getting a hydroponic system going so that you could catch your fish by the kilo, then have it cooked there and choose your own salad. I spent 12 years working in the UK hydro industry so this really appeals to me, I can see a few more lakes in Thailand going down this route in the future.

    • January 6, 2016 11:31 AM
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      Catch and Release

      To each their own with catfish but I agree with Benji; I think they're one of the least healthy fish you can eat because of what they eat. Of course, it wouldn't matter to me if they were the healthiest fish you could eat -- I don't eat fish! My wife says it's crazy for a fisherman not to eat fish but I've just never been able to stomach it. Sure do love to catch 'em, though.

    • January 6, 2016 3:10 PM
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      Catch and Release

      Big old catfish are not good to be eaten for health reasons. Due to modern farming tecniques combined with unchecked fertilizers in the far east, the run off water carries large amounts of heavy metals into the river system. This is absorbed by fish, especially bottom feeders, in the form of Methylmercury. The older & bigger the fish the more mercury absorbed.

    • January 6, 2016 3:16 PM
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      Catch and Release

      Tab Tim, a farmed fish, on the other hand are fun to catch & excellent when cook in salt on a barbie. Recipe :- just add alcohol and Thai people mix with fish = instant party

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